Sometimes when the world is looking real fucked up and you don’t know what else you can do, you just have to tweet at the mayor.

Sometimes when the world is looking real fucked up and you don’t know what else you can do, you just have to tweet at the mayor.

Twitter Synchronicity.

Twitter Synchronicity.

merlin:

Jaunty Jim!

My gosh, I love the public library.

Honestly. Never ceases to amaze me.

If you try and show this stuff to someone who is only somewhat into comics because you think that she’d dig the wild mid-century pop-art aspects of it all, you will quickly learn a thing or two about how 60s Marvel dialogue reads to someone who’s not versed in that particular style of overwordy bombast.

Or so I have heard.

merlin:

Jaunty Jim!

My gosh, I love the public library.

Honestly. Never ceases to amaze me.

If you try and show this stuff to someone who is only somewhat into comics because you think that she’d dig the wild mid-century pop-art aspects of it all, you will quickly learn a thing or two about how 60s Marvel dialogue reads to someone who’s not versed in that particular style of overwordy bombast.

Or so I have heard.

jessethorn:

The Bullseye shirt: very cool and very for sale right now.

A fine way to support a great show and maybe confuse people into thinking you like The Who!

jessethorn:

The Bullseye shirt: very cool and very for sale right now.

A fine way to support a great show and maybe confuse people into thinking you like The Who!

Facebook wouldn’t even let me post weird boner Spider-Man. On further thinking, I don’t know why I would go anywhere other than Tumblr first with it.

The article already makes the “action is his reward” joke, so I’ll go with “Look out! Here comes the Spider-Man”

Facebook wouldn’t even let me post weird boner Spider-Man. On further thinking, I don’t know why I would go anywhere other than Tumblr first with it.

The article already makes the “action is his reward” joke, so I’ll go with “Look out! Here comes the Spider-Man”

craxy:

aspiringpolymath:

beefranck:

You guys.

Looking at these make my teeth hurt.

I might have to change “Weird Oreo Day” to “Weird Chips Ahoy Day” at work.

They put what in what?

I LOVE MY COUNTRY!

Here is a link to donate to the Joslin Diabetes Center also, because they do good work and holy shit those cookies.

craxy:

aspiringpolymath:

beefranck:

You guys.

Looking at these make my teeth hurt.

I might have to change “Weird Oreo Day” to “Weird Chips Ahoy Day” at work.

They put what in what?

I LOVE MY COUNTRY!

Here is a link to donate to the Joslin Diabetes Center also, because they do good work and holy shit those cookies.

asker

matthew-sobol asked: I'm well past what you would call "adult" age, but can I be as awesome as you when I grow up?

kellysue:

arcadysabo:

kellysue:

I didn’t grow up until I was 30ish, so you might be right on track. 

(Also: reports of my awesome may be exaggerated. You’ve been warned.) 

My father is turning 70 in a week, and he hasn’t grown up at all…

Growing old is inevitable.  Growing up is optional.

I think it depends on how you define “growing up.”  

I tend to bristle at the romanticized notion of perennial childhood.  To me, there’s an honor and a relief in taking responsibility, looking after others rather than insisting others look after you, and recognizing you’re not the center of the universe and that few things are as black and white or drama-filled as they seemed in adolescence — all these things are among the many ways I define adulthood.  

If you define “growing up” as forgetting how to play, abandoning imagination or dreams… well, we have different definitions, is all.  What I think of as not being a grown up, I’m fairly certain is not what you’re lauding in your dad.  I suspect what you’re describing, I would just perceive as a playful adult.  

(I’ve had to do business on occasion with adult children. My impulse, rightly so, I’d say, was to put them in time out.)

I want to be a grown up. And I want to model the behavior of a responsible adult for my children — both so they have the freedom to be the children they are and so that they have a paradigm for adult behavior when it’s time, many years from now, for them to take my role.